Pat Robertson approves divorce for Alzheimer reasons

The television evangelist and The 700 Club host is facing a different giant this time. Surprisingly, it’s not the politicians he’s ticked, it’s the Christian... More Below... Posted by on Sep 16th, 2011 and filed under Celebrity News, Featured, News, Television, US.

The television evangelist and The 700 Club host is facing a different giant this time. Surprisingly, it’s not the politicians he’s ticked, it’s the Christian leaders instead who are rebuking the media mogul.

Robertson turned a lot of Christian viewers head when he said on Tuesday’s 700 Club program: I hate Alzheimer’s. It’s one of the most awful things because, here is a loved one, this is the woman or man that you have loved for 20, 30, 40 years, and suddenly, that person is gone. They’re gone. They are gone.

The comment stemmed from a caller who narrated about a friend who started dating other women while his wife lies seriously ill with Alzheimer’s disease. The caller’s friend justifies the act saying that, “his wife as he knows her is gone.”

Robertson approves it, saying: What he says basically is correct. I know it sounds cruel, but if he’s going to do something, he should divorce her and start it all over again, but make sure she has custodial care and somebody looking after her.

The co-host asked Robertson if his advise violates marriage vows. Robertson replied that the disease “is a kind of death, I certainly wouldn’t put a guilt trip on you.”

Russell D. Moore, a dean of the school for theology in at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary wrote a response to Robertson’s sentiments at the Baptist Press News: This is more than an embarrassment. This is more than cruelty. This is a repudiation of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Joel Hunter, a pastor in Northland Church in Orlando told ABC News: I just don’t know how anyone who is  reading Scripture or is even familiar with the traditional wedding vows can come out with a statement like that.

Hunter said it best with: Obviously we can all rationalize the legitimacy for our own comfort that would somehow make it OK to divorce our spouse if circumstances become very different or inconvenient. That’s almost universal. But there’s no way you can get out of what Jesus says about marriage.

Robertson has yet to respond to an interview request from the Times submitted to the Christian Broadcasting Network.